Paper 69: Primitive Human Institutions/ /Melchizedek

Paper 68          Paper 70

Matthew Block suggests that the following authors were influential in writing of this Paper and has prepared a parallel chart:

William Graham Sumner and Albert Galloway Keller, The Science of Society, Volume I (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1927) Wikipedia page: SumnerWikipedia page: Keller.

William Graham Sumner, Albert Galloway Keller, and Maurice Rea Davie, The Science of Society, Volume IV (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1927)

For Biblical cross-references for all Sections: click here.

Introduction

Section 1: Basic Human Institutions

p6Urantia etymology by Chris Halvorson: “specific: Urantia = (y)our heavenly place (i.e., in the cosmos)” “-tia = noun-forming suffix < -t- of L. past participle stem + -ia (cf., -tion and -ion)” “U.B.: “-tia” is indicative of impersonal, while “-ia” is more personal”

cross-references:

Section 2: The Dawn of Industry

cross-references:

p5idleness is mention eleven times: (55:5.2), (69:2.5), (69:8.11), (69:9.2), (71:3.8), (72:5.12), (84:5.10), (113:6.4), (159:3.4), (165:4.7), (181:1.2).

Section 3: The Specialization of Labor

cross-references:

Section 4: The Beginnings of Trade

cross-references:

Section 5: The Beginnings of Capital

cross-references:

Section 6: Fire in Relation to Civilization

p4Andon etymology:  The one who (A) is the first and original (an) human leader (don). Andon was the first male human being.
By Chris Halvorson: “the first (an) true human man (don).”

cross-references:

Section 7: The Utilization of Animals

For the UBtheNEWS “Research page” on Dog Domestication: click here.

For a 2016 article on dog domestication with links to a number of related studies: click here.

p3Dalamatia etymology by Chris Halvorson: “the place (-tia) [to stand] together (ama) with (Dal)igastia”

p5Caligastia etymology: The one whose (capital “C,” specific) darkness (calig-) entirely (as) turns him into a non-person (-tia, normally used for impersonal names, instead of –ia, which would normally be used for a personal name). From Latin caliginosus “misty,” from caliginem (nom. caligo) “mistiness, darkness, fog, gloom.”Caligula was a Roman Emperor who succeeded Tiberius and whose uncontrolled passions resulted in manifest insanity; noted for his cruelty and tyranny; was assassinated.
By Chris Halvorson: “the one who is (-tia) entirely (as) darkenss (calig-) and no longer personal.”

cross-references:

66:5.5 Organization of the Princes Staff re: animal domestication.

81:2.11 Asia had the best animals for domestication; this was helpful to Asia’s early development.

Section 8: Slavery as Factor in Civilization

p10,11; S9p5:

US President, Franklin D. Roosevelt 5/24/37:

“The time has arrived for us to take further action to extend the frontiers of social progress. Such further action initiated by the legislative branch of the government, administered by the executive, and sustained by the judicial, is within the common sense framework and purpose of our Constitution and receives beyond doubt the approval of our electorate.

“The overwhelming majority of our population earns its daily bread either in agriculture or in industry. One-third of our population, the overwhelming majority of which is in agriculture or industry, is ill-nourished, ill-clad and ill-housed.

“The overwhelming majority of this Nation has little patience with that small minority which vociferates today that prosperity has returned, that wages are good, that crop prices are high and that government should take a holiday.

“The truth of the matter, of course, is that the exponents of the theory of private initiative as the cure for deep-seated national ills want in most cases to improve the lot of mankind. But, well intentioned as they may be, they fail for four evident reasons-first, they see the problem from the point of view of their own business; second, they see the problem from the point of view of their own locality or region; third, they cannot act unanimously because they have no machinery for agreeing among themselves; and, finally, they have no power to bind the inevitable minority of chiselers within their own ranks. . . . .”

US President, Franklin D. Roosevelt 6/16/33:

“In my Inaugural I laid down the simple proposition that nobody is going to starve in this country. It seems to me to be equally plain that no business which depends for existence on paying less than living wages to its workers has any right to continue in this country. By “business” I mean the whole of commerce as well as the whole of industry; by workers I mean all workers, the white collar class as well as the men in overalls; and by living wages I mean more than a bare subsistence level-I mean the wages of decent living.

“Throughout industry, the change from starvation wages and starvation employment to living wages and sustained employment can, in large part, be made by an industrial covenant to which all employers shall subscribe. It is greatly to their interest to do this because decent living, widely spread among our 125, 000,000 people, eventually means the opening up to industry of the richest market which the world has known. It is the only way to utilize the so-called excess capacity of our industrial plants. This is the principle that makes this one of the most important laws that ever has come from Congress because, before the passage of this Act, no such industrial covenant was possible.

“On this idea, the first part of the Act proposes to our industry a great spontaneous cooperation to put millions of men back in their regular jobs this summer. The idea is simply for employers to hire more men to do the existing work by reducing the work-hours of each man’s week and at the same time paying a living wage for the shorter week.

“No employer and no group of less than all employers in a single trade could do this alone and continue to live in business competition. But if all employers in each trade now band themselves faithfully in these modern guilds–without exception-and agree to act together and at once, none will be hurt and millions of workers, so long deprived of the right to earn their bread in the sweat of their labor, can raise their heads again. The challenge of this law is whether we can sink selfish interest and present a solid front against a common peril.

“It is a challenge to industry which has long insisted that, given the right to act in unison, it could do much for the general good which has hitherto been unlawful. From today it has that right.”

cross-references:

163:2.11: Jesus never taught that it was wrong to have wealth. . . . The Master regarded the wise investment of excess earnings as a legitimate form of insurance against future and unavoidable adversity. . . . Jesus never personally had anything to do with the apostolic finances except in the disbursement of alms. But there was one economic abuse which he many times condemned, and that was the unfair exploitation of the weak, unlearned, and less fortunate of men by their strong, keen, and more intelligent fellows. Jesus declared that such inhuman treatment of men, women, and children was incompatible with the ideals of the brotherhood of the kingdom of heaven.

p11idleness is mention eleven times: (55:5.2), (69:2.5), (69:8.11), (69:9.2), (71:3.8), (72:5.12), (84:5.10), (113:6.4), (159:3.4), (165:4.7), (181:1.2).

Section 9: Private Property

p19Nebadon etymology by Chris Halvorson: “the first (a) nebular (neb-) upland (don) (The local universe level is the local upland relative to the lowlands where mortals begin their ascension careers in the Milky Way spiral nebula.).” “don < O.E., dun = n., down = upland”

cross-references:

p2idleness is mention eleven times: (55:5.2), (69:2.5), (69:8.11), (69:9.2), (71:3.8), (72:5.12), (84:5.10), (113:6.4), (159:3.4), (165:4.7), (181:1.2).

p5: See above, Section 8.

Maps:

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