Paper 136: Baptism and the Forty Days/ /Midwayer Commission

Paper 135          Paper 137

Matthew Block suggests that the following authors were influential in writing of this Paper and has prepared a parallel chart:

P. Whitwell Wilson, The Christ We Forget: A Life of Our Lord for Men of To-day (New York: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1917) Hathi Trust Digital Library copy. Wikipedia page: Wilson.

Rev. Alfred Edersheim, M.A.Oxon, D.D., Ph.D., The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah (Volume One) (New York: Longman, Green, & Co., Eighth Edition, Revised, 1899) Hathi Trust Digital Library copy, V.1Hathi Trust Digital Library copy, V.2.Wikipedia page: Edersheim.

“Shekinah,” by C. W. Emmet, in Hastings’ Dictionary of the Bible, edited by James Hastings, D.D. (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1909) Hathi Trust Digital Library copy.

Charles Fiske and Burton Scott Easton, The Real Jesus: What He Taught: What He Did: Who He Was (New York and London, Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1929) Anglicanhistory.org: FiskeEpiscopal Church: Easton.

Wm. Arnold Stevens and Ernest Dewitt Burton, A Harmony of the Gospels for Historical Study: An Analytical Synopsis of the Four Gospels (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1904, 1932) Archive.org copy.

David Smith, M.A., D.D., Our Lord’s Earthly Life (New York: George H. Doran Company, 1925)

George A. Barton, Ph.D., LL.D., Jesus of Nazareth: A Biography (New York, The Macmillan Company, 1922) Hathi Trust Digital Library copyWikipedia page: Barton.

“Tiberius,” by A. Souter, in Hastings’ Dictionary of the Bible, edited by James Hastings, D.D. (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1909) Hathi Trust Digital Library copy.

“Pilate,” by A. E. Hillard, in Hastings’ Dictionary of the Bible, edited by James Hastings, D.D. (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1909) Hathi Trust Digital Library copy.

For Biblical cross-references for all Sections: click here.

Introduction

Section 1: Concepts of the Expected Messiah

p1See the article “Why 1 & 2 Kings?” by Lester Grabbe, who founded and organized the European Seminar on Methodology in Israel’s History for 17 year.

cross-references:

p5: kingdom of heaven is at hand (134:9.8), (135:5.7), (135:6.2,8), (135:9.7), (136:1.5), (137:8.15), (142:1.2), (163:1.4).

Section 2: The Baptism of Jesus

p2Urantia etymology by Chris Halvorson: “specific: Urantia = (y)our heavenly place (i.e., in the cosmos)” “-tia = noun-forming suffix < -t- of L. past participle stem + -ia (cf., -tion and -ion)” “U.B.: “-tia” is indicative of impersonal, while “-ia” is more personal”

Melchizedek etymology by Chris Halvorson: “Heb., the king (malki) of righteousness (tsedheq) = U.B., the primary righteous expression (of a local universe descending Son)”

p3Nebadon etymology by Chris Halvorson: “the first (a) nebular (neb-) upland (don) (The local universe level is the local upland relative to the lowlands where mortals begin their ascension careers in the Milky Way spiral nebula.).” “don < O.E., dun = n., down = upland”

p6: Morontia etymology: In general (m) material substance (mor) is like (on) this thing (-tia).
By Chris Halvorson: “that which is (-tia) akin to (on) matter (mor)”
Note also: mor–Danish origin 1930’s, refering to humus formed under acidic conditions.

cross-references:

p1kingdom of God is at hand See also 170:5.19.

Section 3: The Forty Days

p1Caligastia etymology: The one whose (capital “C,” specific) darkness (calig-) entirely (as) turns him into a non-person (-tia, normally used for impersonal names, instead of –ia, which would normally be used for a personal name). From Latin caliginosus “misty,” from caliginem (nom. caligo) “mistiness, darkness, fog, gloom.”Caligula was a Roman Emperor who succeeded Tiberius and whose uncontrolled passions resulted in manifest insanity; noted for his cruelty and tyranny; was assassinated.
By Chris Halvorson: “the one who is (-tia) entirely (as) darkenss (calig-) and no longer personal.”

p4Edentia etymology:  The specific, original and/or archetypal (E) edenic (eden) place (-tia).
By Chris Halvorson: “the (eden)ic place (-tia)”

Uversa etymology by Chris Halvorson: “the hub of the superuniverse that is the seventh expression of triune pattern (“U” is the 21st letter of the alphabet, and 21 equals 7 times 3. Hence, the headquarters worlds of the other superuniverses are Cversa, Fversa, Iversa, Lversa, Oversa, and Rversa. The “U” notation is also used in “Umajor the fifth” and “Uminor the third”.)” “versa = L., focus, hub (see endnote entitled “Versa”)”
“Verse:
masculine: metrical sequence of words (He wrote a verse.); also, versus (plaintiff versus defendant); feminine: poetical character (She wrote in verse.); also, vice versa (vice = in the place of another + versa = focus, hub)
“Versa is the nondirectional aspect of “a turning”, that is, the hub; while versus is the directional aspect, the rotation.”

cross-references:

Section 4: Plans for Public Work

p5Andon etymology:  The one who (A) is the first and original (an) human leader (don). Andon was the first male human being.
By Chris Halvorson: “the first (an) true human man (don).”

Fonta etymology: The specific (F) source or wellspring (font) expressed in an original and/or archetypal manner (a).
By Chris Halvorson: “the first (a) source (font) [for true human offspring]” “-a = L. noun suffix (first declen

p14ancient rock cavern Apparently, this cave has been discovered by J.J. Benitez.

Foundation Map: January 12 to February 23, 26 A.D.

cross-references:

Section 5: The First Great Decision

cross-references:

Section 6: The Second Decision

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Section 7: The Third Decision

cross-references:

Section 8: The Fourth Decision

cross-references:

Section 9: The Fifth Decision

cross-references:

Section 10: The Sixth Decisioncross-references:

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Paper 135          Paper 137

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